Articles

 
 

Three Easy Ways to Mend Fabric

I came across this article on Design Sponge. It offers a short history of mending as practiced by the Japanese, and a simple introduction to some of the stitches and techniques. “Instead of throwing away a torn piece of clothing, or paying the tailor to hide the repair, I love the idea of seeing a flaw as a chance to playfully enhance the beauty of the garment. Using these Japanese textiles as inspiration, here are three ways to easily repair your own clothing and textiles, with minimal materials and fuss, in tried and true methods.”



School of Stitched Textiles

The artist, Judy Martin, is doing very interesting work with stitching.

“Textile Artist Judy Martin is known for her traditional and delicate quilt patterns that are methodically and meditatively hand stitched. Her pieces are defined by her own commentary on multi-cultural attitudes to birth, death and sexuality, making them a powerful and fascinating medium.”

Judy’s website can be found here

There is a fabulous interview with Judy Martin on the School of Stitched Textile’s website (link through image above, courtesy of their site)

There is a fabulous interview with Judy Martin on the School of Stitched Textile’s website (link through image above, courtesy of their site)


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Images courtesy of Selvedge Magazine

Images courtesy of Selvedge Magazine

A Walk in the Rice Field

The embroideries of Somporn Intaraprayon really struck a chord with me. Here’s a story from a newsletter I receive from Selvedge magazine out of London. If you’re not already a subscriber, I recommend you take a look!

“Heavy stitches through hemp create an undulating surface, reminiscent of a rhythmic landscape, shaped by paths and contours of thread. Organic rows of stitches create maps, like enlarged cellular drawings or currents in an indigo ocean, with hidden clues to the place and people that created them. Embroidered spider webs, picnicking ants or numbers from a child’s maths book all give a sense of rural life in Thailand and tell the stories of the local seamstresses that work under Somporn’s guidance.”


Mending as Metaphor: Contemporary Fiber and Cultural Change by Mary Babcock

I found this incredible site when doing a search for my own. I’ve also included a download to her article, “Mending as Metaphor: Contemporary Fiber and Cultural Change” from DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska - Lincoln


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Otto von Busch: From an Article in Surface design Journal from 2013

There is a lot I could write about Otto von Busch, not least how inspired I am by his thinking and methodology. I’ll copy a line from his bio at The New School, that teases some of his appeal, “this is an engaged and collective process of enablement, creative resistance and DIY practice, where a community shares and develops new capabilities of craftsmanship for social engagement.”